June 23, 2006

Less Copying, More Innovating

More lamenting why we aren't Silicon Valley via Ellee Seymour, only this time worryingly it's the shadow chancellor complaining.

To begin with, I thought there were some good points in his article, but the more I think about it the less convinced I become.

Why does it matter how many universities we have in the world's top 20? I don't remember any of my peers at school even thinking of going abroad to a different uni, so we aren't losing tomorrow's startup founders there. My experience of university was that it tended to be rather academic, and not too tuned to business, so encouraging that would be more useful to foster more startups.

I'm also unconvinced as to how useful patents are. Myspace doesn't have anything in that hasn't been done before (and given how ropey it is, most likely done better before).

All these efforts and initiatives trying to emulate Silicon Valley are pointless and will ultimately be futile. If I wanted to be part of Sililcon Valley I'd have gone there. I'm not yet sure what we do need to encourage more startups, but we should be looking at how to build our own success, not copy someone else's.

Posted by Adrian at June 23, 2006 04:41 PM | TrackBack

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Comments

For me I think the US wins because failure is an option. In the UK failure is still seen as well, failure. Here if you go down you lose your house etc. in the USA your house is considered like our "tools of trade" so is ring fenced.

Posted by: Geoff at June 24, 2006 08:51 AM
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